Samsung Archives – Page 3 of 18 – My Blog

Samsung India has confirmed that the next Galaxy On-series smartphone will be launching in the country on Thursday. In a series of tweets, Samsung teased the launch and also confirmed that the upcoming Galaxy On smartphone will be Flipkart exclusive. The South Korean company has so far not revealed the name of the upcoming handset.

The e-commerce website has launched a dedicated page ahead of the launch and is referring it as Samsung Galaxy On Nxt. We expect Samsung to launch the Galaxy On7 (2016) smartphone considering the handset was unveiled in China last month. In a teaser tweet, Samsung said that the next Galaxy On smartphone is powered by an octa-core processor and features a metallic body, in line with the 2GHz octa-core Snapdragon 625 processor and metal body of the Samsung Galaxy On7 (2016).

The Samsung Galaxy On7 (2016) was launched in China at CNY 1,599 (approximately Rs. 16,000) and the India pricing of the handset can be expected to be around the same range.

For specifications, the Samsung Galaxy On7 (2016) features a 5.5-inch (1080×1920 pixels) full-HD TFT display; packs 3GB of RAM; comes with 32GB inbuilt storage; supports expandable storage up to 256GB via micro SD card; runs on Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow; comes with hybrid dual-SIM; sports a 13-megapixel rear camera with LED flash; an 8-megapixel front camera, and is backed by a 3300mAh battery. The handset also features fingerprint scanner that comes embedded in home button at the front. It supports 4G LTE, GPRS/ EDGE, 3G, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth v 4.2, and GPS connectivity options. The Galaxy On7 (2016) also comes with Samsung’s Knox security suite of apps.

To recall, Samsung earlier this month unveiled the Galaxy On8 priced at Rs. 15,900 which was exclusively available via Flipkart. The biggest highlight of the Samsung Galaxy On8 was its 5.5-inch full-HD Super Amoled display.

[“source-ndtv”]

Samsung has halted the production and global sales of the Galaxy Note 7 smartphone and asked users to stop using it after reports came in of replacement units catching fire. Samsung may have been clear with its communications to consumers but the South Korean company isn’t taking any chances of misinformation being spread. According to a media report, Samsung has been pushing a pop-up message to select Galaxy S7 units in an attempt to reassure users that their phones aren’t affected and aren’t being recalled.

TechnoBuffalo’s Todd Haselton reports that some Samsung Galaxy S7 users are receiving a push message from the company that reads, “Your Galaxy S7 is not an affected device.” It also says, “The Galaxy S7 is not subject to recall. You can continue to use your device normally.” At the moment it isn’t clear whether Samsung is sending push messages to just Galaxy S7 users in the US only or outside the country as well.

One of the possible reasons for Samsung to send push messages is the Galaxy Note 7 recall and the company clearly wants to differentiate the two premium units. Another reason may be the use of number “seven” on both the Galaxy Note 7 and Galaxy S7 which may confuse some consumers. Unfortunately, there is no word whether Samsung is pushing such messages to Galaxy S7 Edge users as well which was unveiled alongside Galaxy S7 earlier this year.

A recent report claims that Samsung after discontinuing Galaxy Note 7 smartphones may kill its Note branding entirely. The Galaxy Note 7 fiasco has caused major brand image damage to the company’s Note lineup, and it is quite plausible Samsung will kill the entire Note phablet range after all.

Amidst the exploding Samsung Galaxy Note 7 controversy, a report last month alleged that a Galaxy S7 Edge exploded inside the pocket of an Ohio resident.

[“source-ndtv”]

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 safety issues in the last month or so has become the company’s worst nightmare. The issue forced the company to kill its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones and Samsung may not stop here. If a new report out of Russia is to be believed, then Samsung is reportedly considering killing the “Note” lineup completely, with no future smartphones to carry the iconic phablet brand.

Hi-Tech.Mail.ru citing an unnamed person from Samsung’s corporate headquarters reports that the South Korean company is “planning to abandon” the entire production line of Galaxy Note-series smartphones. The report adds that the reputation of the “Note” branding has been destroyed by the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 exploding issue. Samsung reportedly conducted a survey around various markets including South Korea where 50 percent people have “negative attitude” towards the Note branding. It’s worth noting that Samsung hasn’t made any announcement regarding killing the Note branding for smartphones as of now.

The South Korea-based handset maker earlier this week stopped production of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone while also halted sales worldwide after users reported that the replacement units were also plagued by fire issues. Samsung has ‘strictly’ advised customers to stop using the device. The killing of the Galaxy Note 7 also led the company to cut its operating profit outlook by $2.3 billion (roughly Rs. 15,375 crores) in the third-quarter.

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 steadily became global laughing stock after numerous cases reported of Galaxy Note 7 units exploding while charging due to an alleged battery issue. In some incidents, the explosions due to Galaxy Note 7 led to fire in a jeep and also reportedly put a house on fire. In another case, the explosion of a Galaxy Note 7 caused major damage to hotel room.

The issue last month even led India to ban the use of Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 on all flights, a similar approach taken by other countries as well.

[“source-ndtv”]

Royal Mail Plc, operator of Britain’s main postal service, said on Wednesday it had banned the delivery of Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 smartphones through its network for safety reasons, making it potentially difficult for many Britons to return the recalled devices.

Samsung recalled about 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7s last month after reports some had caught fire due to faulty lithium batteries, and the company said on Tuesday it would stop making the devices after fires were reported in replacement phones.

Royal Mail said the ban also applied to its Parcelforce UK and international courier service.

The company said it would ask customers to detail the contents of their packages to ensure that hazardous items such as faulty lithium batteries were not transported.

[“source-ndtv”]

Samsung may have dug itself into a hole too deep to come out unscathed. The company is in the process of unprecedented second recall, after ‘safe’ Galaxy Note 7 replacement units also started to catch fire. While the engineers at Samsung cannot pin down a solid reason for these explosions, a report suggests that the SoC is to blame, and not the battery.

A Financial Times report states that the explosions are being caused due to an SoC tweak made by company’s engineers with the aim to speed up the charging process. However, the battery could not handle the rate at which it was being charged, and this is causing the handset to catch fire and explode.

“If you try to charge the battery too quickly it can make it more volatile. If you push an engine too hard, it will explode. Something had to give. These devices are miracles of technology – how much we can get out of that tiny piece of lithium-ion,” the report writes, citing a person informed by Samsung executives.

This is in no way confirmed by Samsung, and the company still maintains silence on that front. There is no official word on what is causing the safe units to catch fire, and Samsung engineers are also reportedly unable to narrow down a flaw.

For now, Samsung has completely halted production and global sales of the Galaxy Note 7. The controversy is said to be costing the company billions of dollars, not to mention attract heaps of ill will in the market. In the most recent cases, a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 was caught on video catching fire at a Burger King, and a US plane was immediately vacated after a replaced unit started emitting smoke.

[“source-ndtv”]

In a move that could cost the company billions, not to mention the priceless goodwill of the market, Samsung has completely halted production of the Galaxy Note 7. After the ‘safe units’ started to catch fire, the South Korean electronics giant was forced to shut down its manufacturing engine off for pure safety reasons. Now, a fresh report states that Samsung’s move is mostly because it has no clue on what is causing the fire, and its team of hundreds of engineers are stumped. The main cause of halt in production and uncertainty of future moves is because the Samsung team is unable to isolate the cause of these explosions.

The New York Times cites an anonymous internal source from the company, and claims that after the safe units started catching fire, Samsung’s entire engineering team went back to work to find a solution, but hasn’t found one even after conducting many tests for over a week.

Early in August, Samsung had touted the Galaxy Note 7 to be the best Note device so far, and had even broken tradition to launch it a bit early to fend off competition from Apple. However, the move backfired terribly, and reports of many Samsung Galaxy Note 7 units exploding while on charge started coming in. Samsung had to then stop sales temporarily to assess the issue. Soon after, the company reportedly blamed an in-house SDI battery fault to be the cause of the problem, and restarted production and sales by sticking to one of its third-party battery providers. It even started to recall old handsets as a safety measure, and replaced them with new ‘safe units’.

However, safe units also started catching fire, and because Samsung was unable to find a solution, it just decided to halt production and global sales. It gave up trying to stay afloat without a life jacket, and just surrendered in silence.

Whether Samsung should bring back the Note 7 or kill it altogether for safety reasons is another debate altogether, but these series of events and the damage it has done to the brand’s reputation will take some time to recover. Furthermore, because of this fault, Samsung’s other product lines like refrigerators and washing machines are also now in the scanner.

The Galaxy Note 7 has managed to cause a scare on planes, set a jeep on fire, and incurred damages of $1,400 to a hotel. While investigators take their time to find the new flaw, we just hope that casualties remain to a minimum, and that Samsung does everything in its power to remove these hazardous units off the market.

[“source-ndtv”]

Samsung Electronics Co. cut its third-quarter operating profit outlook by $2.3 billion (roughly Rs. 15,375 crores) after ending production of its fire-prone Galaxy Note 7 smartphones, the first sign of how much the crisis will cost South Korea’s largest company.

Profit will be KRW 5.2 trillion ($4.63 billion or roughly Rs. 30,953 crores) instead of KRW 7.8 trillion in the three months ended September, the company said in a regulatory statement Wednesday. That effectively erases all the mobile business profit that analysts had been projecting. Revenue will be KRW 47 trillion instead of KRW 49 trillion (roughly Rs. 2,91,384 crores). Samsung cut its guidance for the third quarter less than a week after it was first issued, as costs from the global recall escalated and it decided to kill off the Galaxy Note 7. The company has been scrambling for answers in the wake of reports that smartphones were exploding, including supposedly safe models.

“This is a huge cutback,” said Greg Roh, an analyst at HMC Investment Securities Co. “It means Samsung has reflected not only the sales loss from the shutdown but it also means it would bear the costs of the inventories of Galaxy Note 7s in the channel as well as the components they bought a few months back because they can no longer sell the Galaxy Note 7 at all.”

Wednesday’s announcement is the first time the company has put a price on the debacle; analysts had estimated it would cost at least $1 billion. Samsung’s shares have tanked this week as new fire reports emerged. The stock has slumped 10 percent in the past three trading days, wiping $21 billion (roughly Rs. 1,40,385 crores) from its market value.

Samsung’s mobile division was projected to report operating income of KRW 2.7 trillion (roughly Rs. 16,056 crores) in the quarter, according to estimates compiled by Bloomberg. Roh said the revised outlook probably erased that number. “We expected the mobile division to see about KRW 2.6 trillion previously but it will only see a mere KRW 0.3 trillion in the third quarter,” he said.

[“source-ndtv”]

The Samsung Galaxy Note 7 has been in the news for all the wrong reasons, and the company this week finally announced a halt to production and global sales of the smartphone due to safety concerns. Samsung further warned buyers to “power down and stop using the device (including replacements)” immediately, as they were fire hazards. However, not everyone has taken heed of that warning yet, and a new home security camera video has popped up on the Internet showing a Galaxy Note 7 catching fire and billowing smoke in a house in Honolulu.

The video footage, posted by Associated Press, shows a woman named Dee Decasa handling a smoking Galaxy Note 7 device with a great deal of composure and calm. However, due to the shock caused by this incident, she fainted in her living room near her sofa. Ironically, Dee Decasa had reportedly visited Samsung’s own website before the device started smoking.

Even though this event did not result in any serious injuries, it should serve as a wake-up call for those consumers who have not responded to the company’s request to stop using and power down their Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones.

The South Korean company is currently trying to contain the damage that has been caused to its brand of smartphones but reports suggest that the second recall of the Galaxy Note 7 might end up costing the company as much as much as $17 billion.

[“source-ndtv”]

Investigators believe the latest incidents of Samsung smartphones overheating, which prompted it to abandon its Galaxy Note 7 model, may be the result of a flaw different from the one that caused the device’s original recall last month.

Preliminary examination of the evidence from recent battery incidents suggests there is an issue with the batteries made by China’s Amperex Technology Ltd., which were supposed to be a safe alternative to those supplied by another company that led to scores of incidents in which phones burned and melted, according to a person familiar with discussions between government agencies and the company.

The issue may have crept into the supply line after Samsung began replacing Galaxy Note 7 phones that were equipped with batteries made by Samsung SDI, said the person, who wasn’t authorized to speak publicly about the issue. The SDI batteries were slightly too large for the phone, according to a US consumer-safety agency. Samsung is a major shareholder in Samsung SDI.

The apparent new fault helps explain why Samsung would abruptly pull the plug on what was supposed to be its premier phone designed to compete against Apple’s iPhone 7. Amperex, a unit of Japan’s TDK Corp., didn’t respond to requests for comment on Tuesday. Samsung declined to comment.

TDK shares fell as much as 4.5 percent in Tokyo trading. Samsung SDI rose as much as 3.5 percent in Seoul.

Before the September 15 recall, there had been 92 reports of Galaxy Note 7 batteries overheating in the US, with 26 cases causing burns. Samsung and agencies investigating the latest failures haven’t released details about what they believe is causing the incidents.

Samsung is leaving at least some of its most valuable wireless carrier partners in the dark about the root causes of the battery issues, according to one carrier executive who asked not to be named. Samsung is asking some of its partners to share testing data, but the South Korea-based phone maker has not reciprocated with its own data, leaving carriers to deal with replacing phones and not providing customers with explanations of the problem, the executive said.

Reversed course
Samsung moved to recall its phones last month, offering replacements that it assured consumers were safe. Samsung reversed course this week after several of the replacement phones caught fire, shutting down production and asking retailers to stop selling all of the Galaxy Note 7s.

The move sent Samsung shares down 8 percent on Tuesday, vaporizing $17 billion in market value. Samsung’s sterling brand image built up over decades is at risk unless the management team led by Vice Chairman Jay Y. Lee, 48, doesn’t get out in front of the crisis soon.

The company has not said how many new or replacement phones will be affected by the latest announcement. Analysts estimated the original recall would cost between $1 billion and $2 billion, but that figure will likely rise. Chung Chang Won, an analyst at Nomura Holdings Inc., estimated in a research note before the company’s announcement the worst-case scenario of Samsung terminating the Galaxy Note 7 would cost the company about $5 billion in operating profit through 2017.

The incidents in the US are under investigation by the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which Monday issued a statement warning all owners of Galaxy Note 7s to power them off and stop using them.

When the agency announced an agreement with Samsung to begin a government-sanctioned recall on September 15, Chairman Elliot Kaye said batteries made by Samsung SDI had been built slightly too large for the compartment in the phone. Installing them had crimped the corner of the batteries, causing them to short circuit and overheat, Kaye said.

[“source-ndtv”]

Samsung suffered another blow in its effort to move past a crisis over exploding smartphone batteries, as customers reported problems with replacement devices and the company was forced to halt production of the Galaxy Note 7 phones.

Samsung has temporarily stopped making the high-end phones, a person with direct knowledge of the matter said Monday, asking not to be identified because the decision hasn’t been made public. The move came after wireless companies in the US and Australia stopped selling Galaxy Note 7s following reports that replacement devices thought to be safe were overheating and bursting into flames. Samsung shares fell as much as 4.6 percent in Seoul.

The Korean company was engulfed in controversy after its most expensive phone hit the market two months ago and customers began posting videos of devices that had exploded. Samsung quickly issued a recall and began working with officials worldwide to replace the original shipment of 2.5 million phones. But reports of fires from supposedly safe devices began emerging two weeks ago in China and then with replacements in the US, fueling concerns Samsung hasn’t solved the battery problems after all.

“It’s an ongoing nightmare,” said Bryan Ma, vice president of devices research for IDC. “You would have hoped that they could have gotten past this already and moved on. Clearly, it keeps coming back.”

AT&T and T-Mobile US both halted sales of the devices in the US over safety concerns, while Telstra Corp. followed suit in Australia. “Based on recent reports, we’re no longer exchanging new Galaxy Note 7s at this time, pending further investigation of these reported incidents,” AT&T Inc. spokesman Fletcher Cook said in an e-mailed statement on Sunday.

Suwon-based Samsung said it will take immediate steps approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission if it finds a safety issue exists.

The production suspension raises questions about Samsung’s original investigation into the battery problems. The company said the issue stemmed from one supplier, which it had stopped using.

AT&T is the third-biggest customer of the South Korean company while T-Mobile’s parent is No. 4, according to estimates compiled by Bloomberg. Sprint Corp. said its exchange policy is unchanged while Verizon said the phone is out of stock at its stores.

Telstra, Australia’s biggest phone company, is offering alternative phones to customers as Samsung investigates the issue.

The latest imbroglio coincides with mounting pressure from investor Paul Elliott Singer, who this month advocated a break up of the complex Samsung empire. Singer’s Elliott Management Corp. – through affiliates Blake Capital LLC and Potter Capital LLC – proposed that Samsung separate into an operating company and a holding company, dual-list the former on a US exchange, pay shareholders a special dividend of KRW 30 trillion ($27 billion or roughly Rs. 1,79,617 crores) and improve governance by adding three independent board members.

Ma at IDC said the production halt will deal another blow to a smartphone that had won strong reviews when it first came out in August.

“They’ve invested so much in the product, which was supposed to be the product that helps turn the company around,” Ma said. “To their credit, it was doing really, really well. That’s why it’s such a shame it has developed the way it has.”

[“source-ndtv”]