Galaxy Archives – Page 2 of 14 – My Blog

The Samsung Galaxy Note 7 has been in the news for all the wrong reasons, and the company this week finally announced a halt to production and global sales of the smartphone due to safety concerns. Samsung further warned buyers to “power down and stop using the device (including replacements)” immediately, as they were fire hazards. However, not everyone has taken heed of that warning yet, and a new home security camera video has popped up on the Internet showing a Galaxy Note 7 catching fire and billowing smoke in a house in Honolulu.

The video footage, posted by Associated Press, shows a woman named Dee Decasa handling a smoking Galaxy Note 7 device with a great deal of composure and calm. However, due to the shock caused by this incident, she fainted in her living room near her sofa. Ironically, Dee Decasa had reportedly visited Samsung’s own website before the device started smoking.

Even though this event did not result in any serious injuries, it should serve as a wake-up call for those consumers who have not responded to the company’s request to stop using and power down their Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones.

The South Korean company is currently trying to contain the damage that has been caused to its brand of smartphones but reports suggest that the second recall of the Galaxy Note 7 might end up costing the company as much as much as $17 billion.

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Investigators believe the latest incidents of Samsung smartphones overheating, which prompted it to abandon its Galaxy Note 7 model, may be the result of a flaw different from the one that caused the device’s original recall last month.

Preliminary examination of the evidence from recent battery incidents suggests there is an issue with the batteries made by China’s Amperex Technology Ltd., which were supposed to be a safe alternative to those supplied by another company that led to scores of incidents in which phones burned and melted, according to a person familiar with discussions between government agencies and the company.

The issue may have crept into the supply line after Samsung began replacing Galaxy Note 7 phones that were equipped with batteries made by Samsung SDI, said the person, who wasn’t authorized to speak publicly about the issue. The SDI batteries were slightly too large for the phone, according to a US consumer-safety agency. Samsung is a major shareholder in Samsung SDI.

The apparent new fault helps explain why Samsung would abruptly pull the plug on what was supposed to be its premier phone designed to compete against Apple’s iPhone 7. Amperex, a unit of Japan’s TDK Corp., didn’t respond to requests for comment on Tuesday. Samsung declined to comment.

TDK shares fell as much as 4.5 percent in Tokyo trading. Samsung SDI rose as much as 3.5 percent in Seoul.

Before the September 15 recall, there had been 92 reports of Galaxy Note 7 batteries overheating in the US, with 26 cases causing burns. Samsung and agencies investigating the latest failures haven’t released details about what they believe is causing the incidents.

Samsung is leaving at least some of its most valuable wireless carrier partners in the dark about the root causes of the battery issues, according to one carrier executive who asked not to be named. Samsung is asking some of its partners to share testing data, but the South Korea-based phone maker has not reciprocated with its own data, leaving carriers to deal with replacing phones and not providing customers with explanations of the problem, the executive said.

Reversed course
Samsung moved to recall its phones last month, offering replacements that it assured consumers were safe. Samsung reversed course this week after several of the replacement phones caught fire, shutting down production and asking retailers to stop selling all of the Galaxy Note 7s.

The move sent Samsung shares down 8 percent on Tuesday, vaporizing $17 billion in market value. Samsung’s sterling brand image built up over decades is at risk unless the management team led by Vice Chairman Jay Y. Lee, 48, doesn’t get out in front of the crisis soon.

The company has not said how many new or replacement phones will be affected by the latest announcement. Analysts estimated the original recall would cost between $1 billion and $2 billion, but that figure will likely rise. Chung Chang Won, an analyst at Nomura Holdings Inc., estimated in a research note before the company’s announcement the worst-case scenario of Samsung terminating the Galaxy Note 7 would cost the company about $5 billion in operating profit through 2017.

The incidents in the US are under investigation by the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which Monday issued a statement warning all owners of Galaxy Note 7s to power them off and stop using them.

When the agency announced an agreement with Samsung to begin a government-sanctioned recall on September 15, Chairman Elliot Kaye said batteries made by Samsung SDI had been built slightly too large for the compartment in the phone. Installing them had crimped the corner of the batteries, causing them to short circuit and overheat, Kaye said.

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Samsung suffered another blow in its effort to move past a crisis over exploding smartphone batteries, as customers reported problems with replacement devices and the company was forced to halt production of the Galaxy Note 7 phones.

Samsung has temporarily stopped making the high-end phones, a person with direct knowledge of the matter said Monday, asking not to be identified because the decision hasn’t been made public. The move came after wireless companies in the US and Australia stopped selling Galaxy Note 7s following reports that replacement devices thought to be safe were overheating and bursting into flames. Samsung shares fell as much as 4.6 percent in Seoul.

The Korean company was engulfed in controversy after its most expensive phone hit the market two months ago and customers began posting videos of devices that had exploded. Samsung quickly issued a recall and began working with officials worldwide to replace the original shipment of 2.5 million phones. But reports of fires from supposedly safe devices began emerging two weeks ago in China and then with replacements in the US, fueling concerns Samsung hasn’t solved the battery problems after all.

“It’s an ongoing nightmare,” said Bryan Ma, vice president of devices research for IDC. “You would have hoped that they could have gotten past this already and moved on. Clearly, it keeps coming back.”

AT&T and T-Mobile US both halted sales of the devices in the US over safety concerns, while Telstra Corp. followed suit in Australia. “Based on recent reports, we’re no longer exchanging new Galaxy Note 7s at this time, pending further investigation of these reported incidents,” AT&T Inc. spokesman Fletcher Cook said in an e-mailed statement on Sunday.

Suwon-based Samsung said it will take immediate steps approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission if it finds a safety issue exists.

The production suspension raises questions about Samsung’s original investigation into the battery problems. The company said the issue stemmed from one supplier, which it had stopped using.

AT&T is the third-biggest customer of the South Korean company while T-Mobile’s parent is No. 4, according to estimates compiled by Bloomberg. Sprint Corp. said its exchange policy is unchanged while Verizon said the phone is out of stock at its stores.

Telstra, Australia’s biggest phone company, is offering alternative phones to customers as Samsung investigates the issue.

The latest imbroglio coincides with mounting pressure from investor Paul Elliott Singer, who this month advocated a break up of the complex Samsung empire. Singer’s Elliott Management Corp. – through affiliates Blake Capital LLC and Potter Capital LLC – proposed that Samsung separate into an operating company and a holding company, dual-list the former on a US exchange, pay shareholders a special dividend of KRW 30 trillion ($27 billion or roughly Rs. 1,79,617 crores) and improve governance by adding three independent board members.

Ma at IDC said the production halt will deal another blow to a smartphone that had won strong reviews when it first came out in August.

“They’ve invested so much in the product, which was supposed to be the product that helps turn the company around,” Ma said. “To their credit, it was doing really, really well. That’s why it’s such a shame it has developed the way it has.”

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Aviation regulator DGCA may issue a fresh advisory on the use of Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones onboard aircraft after getting latest inputs from its US counterpart, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

The DGCA is already in touch with the FAA on the issue and the fresh advisory is likely to be put in public domain by next week, a senior DGCA official said, two days after a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 caught fire on a US airline flight.

Samsung officially recalled one million of its Galaxy Note 7 mobile phones sold before September 15 after finding that some of their batteries had exploded or caught fire.

Earlier, the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) had completely banned the use of Galaxy Note 7 on board flights as also carrying them in checked-in baggage, which it partially lifted on September 30.

“The FAA guidelines prohibit carrying of Galaxy Note 7 device in the cargo, besides switching off all applications (in case of flight mode) as well as protecting the switch on/off button. We are touch with the FAA over the issue, and if it revisits these guidlines, we will also issue a fresh advisory on the use of device,” the official said.

The FAA guidelines issued on September 16 “prohibit air cargo shipments of recalled or defective lithium batteries and lithium battery-powered devices, and passengers may not turn on or charge the devices when they carry them on board a plane. Passengers must also protect the devices from accidental activation, including disabling any features that may turn on the device, such as alarm clocks, and must not pack them in checked luggage.”

The DGCA, in a public notice on September 12, had advised air travellers “not to turn on or charge the device and also not to stow them in their check-in baggage.”

However, it later allowed passengers to use the device purchased after September 15 which has “green battery charge indication”. The ban remains on Galaxy Note 7 having a white battery charge indication on the screen and manufactured before September 15, which has seen battery overheating.

A Southwest Airline flight from Louisville International Airport in Kentucky to Baltimore was reportedly evacuated on Wednesday after a passenger’s Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phone began smoking shortly before takeoff.

Samsung had said there was no evidence that this incident was related to the new Note 7 and that they were probing the matter.

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South Korea’s Samsung Electronics Co expects third-quarter profit grew 5.6 percent, beating estimates, as a pickup in chip and display earnings likely offset the impact of a global smartphone recall that has roiled the tech giant.

The world’s biggest smartphone maker said in a brief filing on Friday its operating profit for July-September was likely KRW 7.8 trillion ($7 billion), compared with the KRW 7.4 trillion tipped by a Thomson Reuters StarMine SmartEstimate of analysts’ forecasts. A year earlier operating profit was KRW 7.4 trillion.

The firm won’t issue full results until late October and gave no details on the cost of recalling about 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7 phones after batteries caught fire. Analysts have said the Galaxy Note 7 woes – rumbling on with Wednesday reports of a smoking battery in a replacement device – could have undercut mobile earnings by at least KRW 1 trillion (roughly Rs. 5,986 crores).

Revenue for the quarter likely fell 5.2 percent to KRW 49 trillion (roughly Rs. 2,93,352 crores), the South Korean firm said, less than the Thomson Reuters StarMine SmartEstimate of KRW 51.1 trillion.

“Obviously the Galaxy Note 7 recall costs were reflected but (business) segments such as memory and Oled (organic light-emitting diode) displays did well and will probably continue to do so until at least next year,” said IBK Asset Management fund manager Kim Hyun-su.

Samsung’s semiconductor business – the world’s top memory chip maker – is thriving as Apple and peers boost the global market, seeking chips for new iPhones and other products launched ahead of the peak year-end sales season. Germany’s Dialog Semiconductor Plc, an iPhone chip supplier, said on Thursday its revenue beat expectations.

Galaxy Note 7 Chip Boost?
Ironically, the Galaxy Note 7 problems could also boost Samsung’s chip business. Industry executives say the sudden need for chips in 2.5 million replacement phones is exacerbating already tight memory market conditions, which could push prices higher.

Paul Romano, chief operating officer at US-based electronic component distributor Fusion Worldwide, said the firm’s clients, which include Samsung, are currently having a harder time procuring memory chips. Some smartphone makers are also trying to secure more of the chips as they see an opportunity capitalise on Samsung’s mis-steps and boost handset sales, Romano said.

“Sometimes this creates a seize mentality – everyone tries to manage the risk,” said Romano. “Often the response is to procure new product, trying to grab what’s left of a shrinking pile of supply.”

Researcher TrendForce says contract prices for DRAM chips – used in temporary data usage – will rise by more than 10 percent in October-December. Demand is outpacing supply in the market for NAND chips used for long-term data storage during the third quarter, the researcher added, tipping prices to continue rising.

Samsung shares were up 0.5 percent at KRW 1.7 million at 0220 GMT (7:50am IST), compared with 0.3 percent fall for the broader market.

The stock touched a record high of KRW 1.716 million on Thursday after Samsung said it was “carefully reviewing” the proposals by activist investor Elliott Management for a radical corporate makeover that would split Samsung Electronics into a holding vehicle for ownership purposes and a separate operating company.

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Samsung could face an unusual second recall of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones if one that caught fire aboard an airliner this week is a replacement device as its owner says, two former US safety officials said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the Consumer Product Safety Commission are investigating Wednesday’s incident, when a passenger’s phone emitted smoke on a Southwest Airlines Co. plane readying for departure from Louisville, Kentucky. A flight attendant doused it with a fire extinguisher, and the plane was evacuated without injury.

“If it’s the fixed phone and it started to smoke in his pocket, I’m going to guess there’ll be another recall,” said Pamela Gilbert, a former executive director of the consumer agency. “That just doesn’t sound right.”

Samsung has been engulfed in crisis since the Galaxy Note 7 smartphones began to burst into flames just days after hitting the market in August. The Suwon, South Korea-based company announced last month that it would replace all 2.5 million phones sold globally at that point. Samsung said it had uncovered the cause of the battery fires and that it was certain new phones wouldn’t have the same flaws.

The first indications of the existing recall’s financial impact could be seen Friday with the company’s release of earnings that rose at the slowest pace in five quarters. Operating income increased just 5.5 percent to KRW 7.8 trillion ($7 billion or roughly Rs. 46,812 crores) in the three months ended September 30.

China incident
The US safety commission could decide as early as next week on what steps to take, said Gilbert, a partner in Cuneo Gilbert & LaDuca, LLP in Washington. “This is not something you want to leave hanging out there,” she said.

Nancy Nord, a former acting chairwoman of the safety commission, said a second recall doesn’t happen very often.

“Certainly they could do another recall, if it appears this is something beyond an aberration,” she said.

“They need to determine if this was a remediated phone, and if so why did this happen?” said Nord, who is of counsel at Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Matz PC in Washington.

CPSC spokesman Scott Wolfson declined to comment on what action may be taken.

Bloomberg News last week interviewed a customer in China who said his new Galaxy Note 7 had exploded less than 24 hours after it was delivered. The company said it was investigating the incident.

The owner of the phone involved in Wednesday’s incident told investigators it was a replacement Galaxy Note 7, said Captain Kevin Fletcher of the Louisville Metro Arson Squad.

Arson squad
“Due to the damage to the phone itself, we have not been able to physically confirm that yet,” Fletcher said during an interview. “We’re in the process of trying to attempt that.”

Samsung and US officials announced the recall after 92 reports of batteries overheating in the US, with 26 cases involving burns.

Samsung, FAA and Consumer Product Safety Commission representatives were in Louisville and working with arson investigators, Fletcher said. The phone remains in the possession of the arson squad, which is trying to schedule laboratory tests on the phone. It hasn’t been determined where or when those tests will occur, Fletcher said.

There was “extensive heat damage” to the phone and the plane’s carpet, he said.

Brian Green, the phone’s owner, told WAVE television news in Louisville that he got a replacement phone at a retail store after receiving an e-mail about the recall. “It was a good phone, by all indications, from all the information Samsung provided,” Green said. “But it just had its issues.”

Billowing smoke
On the plane, he turned the phone off and put it in his pocket. The device made a popping sound and sent “smoke just billowing out of my clothes,” Green said. He dropped it to avoid getting hurt.

Samsung said in a statement Wednesday that it couldn’t confirm that the incident involved the new phone but would have more information after examining the device. The company didn’t offer an update Thursday and a spokeswoman had no immediate reply to a request for comment on the possibility of another recall.

The CPSC and Samsung have a range of options, from a broad new recall if systemic flaws are discovered in the replacement devices to no action if they don’t find any broader safety issues.

While the safety agency has legal authority to order recalls, that requires court action and could take months. Instead, it almost always operates in collaboration with companies, as it did with Samsung.

Apple competitor
Samsung had raced to complete the introduction of the Galaxy Note 7 before Apple could unveil its new iPhone 7. The Galaxy Note 7 features a larger battery that can store more power than its predecessor.

A battery supplier made the power packs slightly too large for the phone’s compartment, the consumer safety commission said when announcing the recall September 15. As a result, the battery components were sometimes pinched, which could cause a short circuit, according to the agency.

Rechargeable lithium-ion cells like those in the Samsung phones are made with highly flammable chemicals. When they fail, they can generate intense heat or sparks that can ignite those chemicals.

The United Nations International Civil Aviation Organization earlier this year banned bulk shipments of lithium-ion cells from passenger flights after tests showed that they could violently explode even after being doused with fire extinguishers.

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A replacement model of the fire-prone Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphone began smoking inside a US plane on Wednesday, the family that owns it said, prompting fresh investigations by the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Federal Aviation Administration.

A problem with the replacement for the Galaxy Note 7 model would create a new, embarrassing and potentially costly chapter to a global scandal which has hurt Samsung’s reputation. It also could add new dangers for consumers.

Indiana passenger Brian Green’s phone began emitting smoke inside a Southwest Airlines Co flight to Baltimore from Louisville, Kentucky, his wife Sarah told Reuters after speaking with her husband. She said that Green had replaced the original phone about two weeks ago after getting a text message from Samsung.

Samsung said in a statement it was working to recover the device and to understand the cause. “Until we are able to retrieve the device, we cannot confirm that this incident involves the new Galaxy Note 7,” the South Korean company said.

The world’s largest smartphone maker announced a global recall of at least 2.5 million of its flagship Galaxy Note 7 smartphones in 10 markets last month due to faulty batteries causing some phones to catch fire.

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is in touch with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Samsung and the phone’s owner to gather facts, Chairman Elliot Kaye said in a statement, reminding consumers that they could get refunds for the troubled model.

The FAA said in a statement that it had confirmed a Samsung phone caused the smoke on the Southwest flight and that it was investigating the incident.

Technology news site The Verge, which earlier reported the incident, quoted Brian Green as saying the phone was a replacement, and it posted a picture taken by him of the packaging. The picture showed an identifying label with a black box, which Samsung has described as the indicator of a replacement phone. A spokeswoman declined to comment on the picture.

Samsung customers in China have reported problems with phones that have the same battery as the global replacement model, but Samsung has said it examined the Chinese phones and found the batteries were not at fault.

Green picked up the new phone at an AT&T Inc store on Sept. 21, the Verge said.

Southwest said the plane was evacuated after a customer reported smoke from a Samsung device. All passengers and crew exited the plane and no injuries were reported, a Southwest Airlines spokesperson said.

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While Samsung is busy putting out fires (literally) on the Galaxy Note 7 recall, other smartphone makers are getting the most out of Samsung’s misery. The latest to take a dig at the South Korean giant is LG. The company’s customer care department seems to be randomly sending messages to users ahead of the Diwali festival with a friendly, yet mocking message.

The message – “Heard the news of exploding products? At LG, our products go through multiple tests to ensure safety of our most valuable asset – YOU. Have a safe Diwali with LG.” – is a clear jab at the recent news of exploding Galaxy Note 7 devices from Samsung.

Samsung officially announced a recall of its Galaxy Note 7 on September 2. Reports of Galaxy Note 7 smartphones catching fire has resulted in an unprecedented recall, costing the company billions of dollars. Samsung has been slowly replacing affected Galaxy Note 7 devices and said on Thursday more than 1 million people globally are now using Galaxy Note 7 smartphones with batteries that are not vulnerable to overheating and catching fire.
In September, Lenovo-owned Motorola also took a jab at Samsung when it offered free Incipio offGRID Power Pack with every Moto Z Droid purchase with a quote that read “At Moto, our priority is safety first. Unlike some manufacturers, we adhere to the highest standards in quality and testing of all our batteries.”

The LG V20 is ready to go on sale this month and it looks like the company is hoping Samsung’s recent tragedy will attract customers over to its side. LG India’s Managing Director, Kim Ki-Wan, confirmed to Gadgets 360 that the company plans to bring the LG V20 smartphone to India soon, perhaps just in time for the Diwali festival.

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Samsung Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Edge, Galaxy S7, and Galaxy S7 Edge owners are reporting battery drain issues, after installing the latest Oculus app update. Users have been reporting of the issue on Oculus and Reddit forums, and claim that the issue seems to resolve itself after the app is deleted altogether.

Samsung users claim that their battery drains quickly as the Oculus app continues to run in the background constantly and put strain on the smartphone’s CPU. On the Oculus forum, users claims that almost one percent battery drained every 30 seconds from their smartphones, because of the update. For all those unaware, the Oculus app is a required install if users want to use their smartphones with the Gear VR headset. Some Samsung users also reported that their smartphone refused to charge up to maximum, even after leaving it on charge overnight. Overheating of phones while on charge, and the TouchWiz UI going wonky was also reported in some cases.

However, Reddit users claim that deleting the app resolves all the issues at once. The devices stop acting up, they charge fully, and the battery drain issue also disappears. Oculus acknowledged the issue and confirmed that it has been resolved. It told Gizmodo that updating or re-installing the app won’t cause any of the above-mentioned problems now.
“We recently pushed an update to the Oculus app that inadvertently caused some people to experience phone battery drain. The team has issued a fix that prompts people to update the Oculus software when they open the Oculus app. If they do not see the prompt, then the phone has been automatically updated and no further action is needed,” the company told the publication.

Samsung has being courting a lot of controversies this season, and this latest one, however temporary, will cause further dents in its reputation. The Samsung Galaxy Note 7 battery fault forced Samsung to do a worldwide recall, reporting a loss of billions. For now, Samsung has delayed the launch of the Galaxy Note 7 in India indefinitely. It assures it will fulfil pre-orders soon, but has not given any timeline for delivering on that promise.

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The Samsung Galaxy On8 is now available to buy in India, exclusively via Flipkart. To recall, the smartphone was launched last week at Rs. 15,900, and was due to go on sale from Sunday midnight via the online retailer during its Big Billion Day 2016 sale – it is now available at a discounted price of Rs. 14,900. The smartphone is available in three colour variants in the country – Black, Gold, and White.

The biggest highlight of the Samsung Galaxy On8 is its 5.5-inch full-HD Super Amoled display that was being teased ahead of its launch. The smartphone packs metal body and Samsung claims it features diamond cut metal frames. Much like recently unveiled Samsung mid-range smartphones, the Galaxy On8 will also come with features like UDS (Ultra Data Saving) mode and S bike mode as part of the company’s “Make for India” initiatives.

Running Android 6.0 Marshmallow, the Galaxy On8 is powered by an octa-core processor clocked at 1.6GHz coupled with 3GB of RAM. The handset packs 16GB inbuilt storage and comes with expandable storage up to 128GB via microSD card. The 4G-enabled Galaxy On8 smartphone sports a 13-megapixel rear autofocus camera with LED flash and f/1.9 aperture. There is a 5-megapixel front camera with LED flash on board as well. Backed by a 3300mAh battery, the smartphone supports dual Micro-SIMs. It measures 151.7x76x7.8mm and weighs 169 grams. Samsung says that the Galaxy On8 also supports VoLTE.

Commenting on the launch, Manu Sharma, Vice President, Mobile Business, Samsung India said, “The Galaxy On8 is the perfect smartphone for consumers seeking an optimal mix of style, portability and powerful performance. The device not only looks stylish but also packs a punch with a superior consumer experience with powerful processor and vivid display. We are extremely pleased to announce the new Galaxy On8 exclusively on Flipart’s Big Billion Day Sale.”

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