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Samsung has halted the production and global sales of the Galaxy Note 7 smartphone and asked users to stop using it after reports came in of replacement units catching fire. Samsung may have been clear with its communications to consumers but the South Korean company isn’t taking any chances of misinformation being spread. According to a media report, Samsung has been pushing a pop-up message to select Galaxy S7 units in an attempt to reassure users that their phones aren’t affected and aren’t being recalled.

TechnoBuffalo’s Todd Haselton reports that some Samsung Galaxy S7 users are receiving a push message from the company that reads, “Your Galaxy S7 is not an affected device.” It also says, “The Galaxy S7 is not subject to recall. You can continue to use your device normally.” At the moment it isn’t clear whether Samsung is sending push messages to just Galaxy S7 users in the US only or outside the country as well.

One of the possible reasons for Samsung to send push messages is the Galaxy Note 7 recall and the company clearly wants to differentiate the two premium units. Another reason may be the use of number “seven” on both the Galaxy Note 7 and Galaxy S7 which may confuse some consumers. Unfortunately, there is no word whether Samsung is pushing such messages to Galaxy S7 Edge users as well which was unveiled alongside Galaxy S7 earlier this year.

A recent report claims that Samsung after discontinuing Galaxy Note 7 smartphones may kill its Note branding entirely. The Galaxy Note 7 fiasco has caused major brand image damage to the company’s Note lineup, and it is quite plausible Samsung will kill the entire Note phablet range after all.

Amidst the exploding Samsung Galaxy Note 7 controversy, a report last month alleged that a Galaxy S7 Edge exploded inside the pocket of an Ohio resident.

[“source-ndtv”]

Samsung Electronics is urging consumers worldwide to stop using Galaxy Note 7 smartphones immediately and exchange them as soon as possible, as more reports of the phones catching fire emerged even after the company’s global recall.

The call from the South Korean company, the world’s largest smartphone maker, comes after US authorities urged users to switch the Galaxy Note 7 off and not to use or charge it during a flight. Several airlines around the world asked travelers not switch on the jumbo smartphone or put it in checked baggage, with some carriers banning the phone on flights.

In a statement posted Saturday on its website, Samsung asked users around the world to “immediately” return their existing Galaxy Note 7 and get a replacement.
“We are asking users to power down their Galaxy Note 7s and exchange them as soon as possible,” said Koh Dong-jin, Samsung’s mobile president. “We are expediting replacement devices so that they can be provided through the exchange program as conveniently as possible.”

Consumers can visit Samsung’s service centers to receive rental phones for temporary use. Samsung plans to provide Galaxy Note 7 devices with new batteries in South Korea starting September 19, but schedules for other countries vary.

Earlier this month, Samsung announced an unprecedented recall of 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7s worldwide just two weeks after the phone was launched. That move came after Samsung’s investigation into reports of fires found that rechargeable lithium batteries manufactured by one of its suppliers were at fault.

The US was among the first countries to take a step following the recall. Late Friday, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission urged owners of the phone to turn them off and leave them off. It also said it was working with Samsung and hoped to have an official recall “as soon as possible.”

The recall by the safety commission will allow the US Federal Aviation Administration to ban passengers from carrying the phones on planes. The FAA already warned airline passengers late Thursday not to turn on or charge the Galaxy Note 7 during flights and not to put the smartphone in their checked bags.

Scandinavian Airlines said Saturday that it has prohibited passengers from using the Galaxy Note 7 on its flights because of concerns about fires. Singapore Airlines has also banned the use or charging of the device during flights.

Samsung said it had confirmed 35 cases of the Galaxy Note 7 catching fire as of September 1, most of them occurring while the battery was being charged.

There are at least two more cases that Samsung said it is aware of – one at a hotel in Perth, Australia, and another in St. Petersburg, Florida, where a family reported that a Galaxy Note 7 left charging in their Jeep had caught fire, destroying the vehicle.

Samsung released the Galaxy Note 7 on August 19. The Galaxy Note series is one of the most expensive lineups made by Samsung.

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]